Monitoring and Warning Service

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Monitoring and Prediction

There is a need for a sound scientific basis for predicting the risks faced. Therefore constant monitoring of possible disaster signs is necessary to generate accurate warnings in timely fashion. Multi-hazard approaches must involve various monitoring agencies.


Non-functional rain gauge at Masongbo Community [Photo Credit: INTEGEMS] 

Water gauge monitoring system at Dodo dam [Photo Credit: INTEGEMS]

Systems with monitoring and predicting capabilities provide timely estimates of the potential risk faced by communities, economies and the environment. Warning services lie at the core of the system. There must be a sound scientific basis for predicting and forecasting hazards and a reliable forecasting and warning system that operates 24 hours a day. Continuous monitoring of hazard parameters and precursors is essential to generate accurate warnings in a timely fashion. Warning services for different hazards should be coordinated where possible to gain the benefit of shared institutional, procedural and communication networks.
 Measurement of water Level
Monitoring of High Flood Water Level 
Warning services lie at the core of the system. There must be a sound basis for predicting and forecasting hazards as well as reliable forecasting and warning system operating at all times. Continuous monitoring of hazard parameters and contributing factors is essential to generate accurate and timely warnings. Warning services should be coordinated with stakeholders and relevant agencies to gain benefits of shared institutional, procedural and communication networks. Communities are exposed and vulnerable to disaster risks from various hazards. It is important that community members themselves are aware of such risks and vulnerabilities. One way to develop this understanding in the community is through risk assessment and risk mapping exercises to help prioritise which hazards an early warning system will focus on and guide response preparedness activities, as well as disaster prevention. These assessments and mapping exercises could be based on the community’s different categories of vulnerabilities (human, social, economic and environmental), as well as their previous experiences with natural hazards. Raising awareness about the risks that communities face and using past experiences as guiding principles can help both DRR implementing partners and communities understand why certain risks are prioritised.

Warning requirements:

      • Lead-time, frequency and timing
      • Locally relevant
      • Understandable (content, language)
      • Locally actionable – meets end user needs
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